Women, gender and language in Morocco

by Fatima Sadiqi

Publisher: Brill in Leiden

Written in English
Published: Pages: 336 Downloads: 688
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Edition Notes

Statementby Fatima Sadiqi.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPJ
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 336 p. ;
Number of Pages336
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22521148M
ISBN 109004128530

All Culture Book and Movie Reviews History Profiles Narrative on Gender-Based Violence in Morocco. reach full recognition as one of the country’s foundational languages. Women’s rights. Morocco is a context in which secularist and Islamist voices seem irreconcilably opposed in political discourse – at the expense of womens and gender rights. This lecture explores this in three main parts. The first part presents the referent’s take on the overall context in which the contestations of women’s and gender rights in Morocco [ ]. The challenges. The relevance and pertinence of available gender-related SDG indicators is unquestionable in Morocco. For example, 21% of the indicators measuring the achievement of SDG 5 are not produced, available or updated and 25% of the statistics needed to measure women’s economic participation are not available.   Overall, the vibrant women’s movement of Morocco in the past 20 years has been a unique example of dynamic dialogue between diverse women’s groups along the religious-secular political spectrum.

Being that it is a literate language, most women are not commonly found using it, as women are poorly educated in Morocco, especially in rural areas. Although masculine, it is seen as attractive if a woman does speak French, because it shows a higher education for a woman. Moroccan Arabic is one of the feminine languages of Morocco. Using gender-inclusive language means speaking and writing in a way that does not discriminate against a particular sex, social gender or gender identity, and does not perpetuate gender stereotypes. A literacy course in Morocco. Photo via Flickr user Trade for Development. Morocco has long been touted as a beacon for progress in the Middle East and North Africa, especially since , when. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which gender intersects with other structures of identity formation and social life, such as ethnicity, class, and religion. Topics include: doctrinal norms and lived realities, language and gender, models of masculinity, Moroccan feminism and women’s rights, gender and international migration.

  The gender pattern is explained by the observation that in most contexts where status is relevant, men are more likely than women to occupy high-status positions; if all other things are equal. This Note focuses on women’s family law rights in Morocco, a country located in northwestern Africa, and often regarded as the western boundary of the Muslim-Arab world. Significantly, despite Morocco’s shared roots with nations such as Saudi Arabia in culture, religion, and language, the Moroccan government has interpreted similar traditions to yield a starkly different stance: gender.   (According to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report, France ranks 11th in the world in terms of overall gender equality, but 64th in the world in terms of women. This constant mixture of languages, rather than being uncommon, is actually entirely characteristic of a Moroccan conversation. As a culture, Morocco has embraced a multilingual norm. In fact, speaking multiple languages is much more than just an asset in the Moroccan professional world—it is a .

Women, gender and language in Morocco by Fatima Sadiqi Download PDF EPUB FB2

This volume deals with the complex but poorly understood relationship between women, gender, and language in Morocco, a Muslim, multilingual, multicultural, and developing country. The hypothesis on which the book is based is that an understanding of gender perception and women's agency can be achieved only by taking into account the structure Cited by: This volume deals with the complex but poorly understood relationship between women, gender, and language in Morocco, a Muslim, multilingual, multicultural, and developing country.

The hypothesis on which the book is based is that an understanding of gender perception and women's agency can be achieved only by taking into account the structure of power in a specific culture and that language /5(2). This book is a product of more than a decade of reflection and research on the complex and fascinating link between women, gender, and language in Morocco.

Being a theoretical syntactician who is deeply impregnated by the generative view that the. The book under review tries to draw out the ties that link gender and language and their constructs in the case of Moroccan women thr ough a multidisciplinary : Joseph Chetrit.

Women, Gender and Language in Morocco by Fatima Sadiqi,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Women, Gender and Language in Morocco: Fatima Sadiqi: We use cookies to give you the best possible experience/5(5).

A study of the complex relationship between women, gender and language in Morocco, a Muslim, multilingual, multicultural and developing country. It argues that gender perception is best understood by looking at the structure of power in a culture and that language is a key component of this power.

Women, Gender, and Language in Morocco Fatima Sadiqi. Leiden and Boston: Brill, ISBN pages. Reviewed by Deborah Kapchan, New York University Fatima Sadiqi 's newest book is an oeuvre unto itself.

The title - Women, Gender, and Language in Morocco - is completely apt to the comprehen-siveness of the volume. Women, Gender and Language in Morocco.

June ; Journal of Pragmatics 35(6)–; DOI: /S(03) Authors: Sara Mills. Book Reviews: Breaking New Grounds: Gender. Fatima Sadiqi’s newest book is an oeuvre unto itself. Th e title—Women, Gender, and Language in Morocco—is completely apt to the comprehensiveness of the volume. It covers not just the intersection of these topics but their separate intellectual.

This text is an original investigation in the complex relationship between women, gender, and language in a Muslim, multilingual, and multicultural setting.

Moroccan women's use of monolingualism (oral literature) and multilingualism (code-switching) reflects their agency and gender-role subversion in a heavily patriarchal society. Get this from a library.

Women, gender, and language in Morocco. [Fatima Sadiqi] -- This volume deals with the complex but poorly understood relationship between women, gender, and language in Morocco, a Muslim, multilingual, multicultural, and developing country.

The hypothesis on. We Share Walls: Language, Land, and Gender in Berber Morocco explores how political economic shifts over the last century have reshaped the language practices and ideologies of women (and men) in the plains and mountains of rural Morocco.

Offers a unique and richly textured ethnography of language maintenance and shift as well as language and place-making among an Cited by: "Women's literacy has become a priority target of many developing countries since WCEFA, the World Conference on Education for All, which was held in Jomtien, Thailand, in March The conference acknowledges the need to reduce the gender gap in illiteracy by encouraging and ensuring girls' and women's education.

Accordingly, non-governmental and voluntary associations in Morocco joined the. Women, Gender and Language in Morocco by Fatima Sadiqi avg rating — 5 ratings — published — 2 editions. Women, Gender, and Language in Morocco (2nd ed.). Brill Academic Publishers.

Largely acclaimed as the first international book on language and gender in the MENA region. Reviewed for various international and refereed journals such as Gender and language, International Sociology, Journal of Pragmatics, and International Studies.

Reads Women, Gender and Language in Morocco (Women and Gender: The Middle East and the Islamic World, 1) (Women and Gender: The Middle East and the Islamic World Wome) New E-Books Report Browse more videos.

We Share Walls: Language, Land, and Gender in Berber Morocco explores how political economic shifts over the last century have reshaped the language practices and ideologies of women (and men) in the plains and mountains of rural Morocco.

Offers a unique and richly textured ethnography of language maintenance and shift as well as language and place-making among an. $Û £ ´ social sciences Article Women, Gender, and Politics in Morocco Moha Ennaji International Institute for Languages and Cultures, University of Fès, B.P.

50, Fès 30Morocco. This article analyzes the intersection of gender, women’s activism, and political participation in Morocco in a socio-political approach. The emergence of women’s activism is an answer to the gender-based discrimination in the country.

Women’s non-government organizations (NGOs) struggle for women’s rights and participate actively in the feminization and democratization of the public. Get this from a library. Gender, literacy, and empowerment in Morocco. [Fatima Agnaou] -- This book's concept concerns the positive correlation between literacy and women's development and empowerment in developing countries.

As the global champion for women and girls, UN Women recognizes the importance of language in fighting gender bias and promotes the use of gender-inclusive language in all contexts and at all times.

Gender-inclusive language refers to language that places both women and men at the same level, and which does not convey gender stereotypes.

Gender and EFL Learning in Morocco,The objective of this study is to investigate the ways whereby English language textbooks reinforce gender stereotypes. The main aim is to evaluate Ticket 2 English and to analyze the representations of both women and men in Moroccan EFL textbooks.

I would like to investigate the effect of these gender roles represented in this textbook on. Moha Ennaji is a former Fulbright Scholar and visiting professor at Rutgers University.

He is Professor of Linguistics, Culture and Gender Studies, co-editor of Women in the Middle East and North Africa: Agents of Change () and author of a number of books on culture and gender studies in North Africa. Fatima Sadiqi is Professor of Linguistics and Gender Studies at Fès University.

There are a number of languages of two official languages are Standard Arabic and Tamazight. Moroccan Arabic (known as Darija) is the spoken native languages of prestige in Morocco are Arabic in its Classical and Modern Standard Forms and some times French, the latter of which serves as a second language for approximately 33% of Moroccans.

Book Description. This book examines the position of women in the contemporary Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Although it is culturally diverse, this region shares many commonalities with relation to women that are strong, deep, and pervasive: a space-based patriarchy, a culturally strong sense of religion, a smooth co-existence of tradition and modernity, a transitional stage in.

Inthe UN Development Program Gender-related Development Index placed Morocco out of countries, shown by objective measurements of international institutions. GENDER EQUALITY IN MOROCCO. Though Morocco has made significant advancements in women’s rights since King Mohammed VI’s ascension to the throne init still ranks out of countries according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report and ranks out of countries in women’s economic participation and opportunity.

Language was a particular feature and target of Women’s feminist movements in the ‘60s and ‘70s. “The very semantics of the language reflects [women’s] condition. We do not even have our own names, but bear that of the father until we echange it for that of a husband.” (Robin Morgan ( ), Going Too Far) Claim: Language is sexist.

“The fact that Ishtar's sexual encounters usually mingle eroticism with violence was pointed out by Harris ( ). However, it is not because Ishtar shatters the boundaries of her sex by proposing marriage (a masculine act) that Gilgamesh is frightened. "Dr. Charrad's convincingly argued and meticulously researched book raises the bar of comparative studies of gender and the State, while making a unique contribution to knowledge about the rights and status of Muslim women in general and of the women of the Maghrib in particular."and#;Rae Blumberg, author of Engendering Wealth and Well-being.

Moroccan women can only express authority in the household and when outside this private domestic world, their agency comes to clash with men’s public authority. In the context of ‘everyday sexism,’ the invisibility of Moroccan women shifts the focus onto the visible women (tourists) who visit Morocco.To understand how laws affect women and whether they contribute to advancing gender equality, it is crucial to assess proposals with regards to women’s rights during the process of developing laws.

Though evaluating legislation from a gender perspective can reveal inequalities between women and men, it unfortunately does not actively protect.Contestations of Women's and Gender Rights in Morocco: A Reading from the 'Center' Public Inline Lecture by Prof.

Fatima Sadiqi (Fez, Morocco) Veranstalter Research Group "Global Contestations of Women's and Gender Rights" at the Center for interdisciplinary Research of Bielefeld University (ZiF).